About Invisible Indianapolis

Albert and Allen Hazen at Terry's Market in 1948. The corner store at South Capitol and Ray Streets closed in the 1960's when interstate construction removed most of the homes in the near-Southside neighborhood (image courtesy Terry Hazen Ward, IUPUI University Library Neighborhood of Saturdays collection).

Albert and Allen Hazen at Terry’s Market in 1948. The corner store at South Capitol and Ray Streets closed in the 1960’s when interstate construction removed most of the homes in the near-Southside neighborhood (image courtesy Terry Hazen Ward, IUPUI University Library Neighborhood of Saturdays collection).

Invisible Indianapolis examines history and material culture in a series of seemingly “invisible” Indianapolis neighborhoods.  The project focuses on places that initially may seem counter-intuitive to our ideas about what constitutes “historical” sites; that is, in many reaches of the city, the material remains of community heritage are fragmentary or entirely effaced, and in some places only a handful of elders preserve local memories.  Invisible Indianapolis underscores the stories of American life in a breadth of seemingly commonplace places transformed by factors including real estate “redlining,” racial and religious discrimination, postwar highway construction, and gentrification.

Invisible Indianapolis is supported by the 2016-2017 Charles R. Bantz Chancellor’s Community Fellowship.  The Bantz Chancellor’s Community Fellowship recognizes former Chancellor Charles R. Bantz’s commitment to community-engaged research and scholarship.  The Fellowship is designed to reinforce IUPUI campus-community engagement; it partners IUPUI faculty, students, and community members in a year-long project that is of mutual value and interest; and it will produce meaningful community impact.

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